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with compliance departments and upstarts with energy and ideas. this status inequality demands our attention. last week's bipartisan passage of the unfunded mandate's transparency and information act is a good start, but much more must be done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the chair will receive message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: mr. secretary. the secretary: i am directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina eek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for our veterans. the skill sets learned while serving in the armed forces are highly valued and confidence is extraordinary of veterans who have proven work ethic.
will be recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the nuclear energy sector, not only do nuclear power plants provide affordable, reliable and clean energy, they also provide many quality high-paying jobs and are the backbone of many communities. my district is shome to a nuclear plant -- is home to a nuclear plant that employs near 700 people. nuclear energy is a secure energy source that plays a vital role in a responsible, all-of-the-above energy policy. mr. davis: it is the biggest provider of reliable, efficient, clean energy and it provides on-demand energy 24/7. the recent record cold temperatures in the midwest show the importance of energy diversification. many of my constituents saw steep increases in their electric bill. while pipes froze and transportation became difficult because of iced roads and bridges, nuclear power remained consistent. i worry that things could have become worse if nuclear power wasn't able to fill the gaps where needed. this is why i stand here today in support of nuclear energy and all of my constituents and the hardworkin
care reform, one of the authors of this bill, mr. waxman, the ranking member of energy and commerce, from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. the truth of the matter is no matter how many votes the republicans cast to repeal the affordable care act, and no matter how many distortions they spread about the law, there are some facts they cannot change. they cannot change the fact that because the affordable care act nobody in america can ever again be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. they cannot change the fact that a woman can never be charged more than a man for the same coverage. they cannot change the fact that a family will never again be left without coverage just because their child's hospital bills got too high. these facts are stubborn. they are inconvenient for my republican colleagues, so they ignore them and they deny them. republicans have voted or will today 50 times to try to take away the basic security and freedom guaranteed by the aff
cell energy and all of them hitting 52 week highs. all thanks to to as low. the unstoppable stock. adam: the obama administration is rolling out its 2015 budget and singing the familiar tune. can use a tax hikes? cheryl: oil prices reversing course, down 4% after closing at the highest level in five months yesterday. commodity analyst matt smith and phil flynn saying get used to this volatility. the energy burrito and the mighty fallen coming up next. when does your work en does it end after you've expanded your business? after your company's gone public? and the capital's been invested? or wn your compan's bought another? is it over after you' given back? you never stop achieving. that's why, at barclays, our ambition is to always realize yours. coach calls her a team player. she's kind of special. she makes the whole team better. he's the kind of player that puts the puck, horsehide, bullet. right where it needs to be. coach calls it logistics. he's a great passer. dependable. a winning team has to have one. somebody you can count on. somebody like my dad. this is my dad. somebody li
-of-the-above energy strategy. it's part of our focus on the floor this week, in fact. because developing our own resources just doesn't bring jobs home, it strengthens america abroad. last month the energy and commerce committee released a report that says, and i'll quote, by becoming a natural gas exporter, the u.s. can you is plant the influence of other -- supplant the influence of other importers like russia and iran while strengthening our allies and trading partners around the world. the key word in that statement is can. we can is up plant russia's influence but -- supplant russia's influence but we won't as long as we have to contend with the energy department's achingly slow approval process. as we speak, the administration is sitting on 24 applications for natural gas exports, it's approved just six in the last three years. this amounts to a de facto ban that only emboldins vladimir putin, allowing him to sell large quanltities of natural gas to -- quantities of natural gas to our allies. the american people have seen the threat that putin puts forward. they know something must be done
the deficit. most important of all, it is about energy independence for our country. it is about working with canada and producing energy in this country so that we get our energy here locally rather than having to get it from the middle east. that is what americans want. they want us to be energy secure in this country. to do that, we need to produce more energy like we are doing in my state of north dakota and montana across the border. movepipeline would mode -- that loyal as well as canadian oil. it is about producing oil here, or getting it from our closest friend and neighbor, canada, rather than being dependent on the middle east. classification you to have to wait on a pipeline, how safe israel transportation of these products versus pipeline transportation? is it.that we are becoming more energy secure. it is great. it is jobs and what people want. to go with that energy, we need infrastructure. that infrastructure includes pipelines as well as moving products safely by train or truck. the keystone xl will take 500 trucks a day off rose in western north dakota. it is a safety is
bailout, and second, they don't control their own energy. they have to get energy from russia. they as well as europeans get russian energy, now, when you think about of what -- how can you solve ukraine. europe can't stand up to russia europe needs russian energy, i take a step back, say what happened in last week,ing in to ukraine, nobody is talking about that chinese have come out support of the russians are. and while putin was preparing this, i think he has prepared this for long time in middle of the olympics he left sochi, he went to moscow and met with egyptian defense minister, they sign an agreement saying that russia will replace united states as primary weapon supplier for egypt, that is a major strategic in middle east. because egypt and israel, have kept the peace for 40 years, not just what we're all focused on tragedy of ukraine, but a much bigger picture, where whose destiny is anyone controlling it should be a caution for united states don't get into debt, and absolutely make sure that your energy self much. much. lou: wore working on the latter, but we're so
in the ukraine. deteriorating. the country's energy situation is crucial. after the break, we'll find out who is waiting in -- who is weighing in on the ukraine's power struggles. ♪ >> welcome back. we're taking a closer look at europe's energy situation. affected by the conflict in the ukraine. what happens next is completely up in the air. joining us now is the executive chair of the global energy symposium. let's talk about europe's exposure to russian gas and the ukrainian throughput. to what extent should we be worried by the escalating situation? >> the longer this crisis remains, the greater the impact is going to be on energy expectations in europe. we are already seeing that this morning. of any has happened great significance in the ukraine other than some russian troops showing up in the crimea. it has been enough to start spiking prices and spiking future levels. that is going to be more pronounced as we move forward. the interesting thing is what is already doing in new york, which i think is an overreaction at -- moment, given what is at what is actually occurring. i keep tell
up energy production all over the countr country, fracking, you tell me, these five things, i would think the alternative party in the country could agree with? >> well, sean, to quote jerry mcguire, you had me at hello. >> i'm trying to get an answer. >> i completely agree. yes, yes, yes and yes. you're exactly right. but look, that is presenting a positive pro-growth vision. there is a better way. we can bring back economic growth and get people back to work but not continuing down the road of the obama economic policy which is hurting millions of american's all over this country. >> are you seriously considering, a lot of people banter your name out there, are you considering a run for the 2016 presidency? >> well, i appreciate the question. right now i'm trying to win the senate. i think republicans can take control of the senate in 2014. my view as a senator, as a voter, the person who i intend to vote for is whoever is standing up and leading, whoever is effectively leading. i hope everyone stepping up. i hope we have an abundance of riches. that would be a terrific outcome fo
and the guy that's supplying the energy for the united states? >> host: where did you read they pay for leasing of the land and taxes? >> caller: that's just on the internet. >> host: zachary goldfarb, the oil companies and gas company to pay taxes and they do have to pay the federal government to lease these lands. >> guest: that's right. the reason the government thinks is there is its multiple. first, the government belief these are public lands in many cases and some some of the benefits of that oil and gas should spread the people in those committees and around the country and not just into the pockets of the company. secondly, there is enforcement, environmental regulations in terms of government oversight when you do natural resource billing and exploration in the united states to protect in private, natural habitats and so forth. that needs to be paid for as well. i think the funds and licensing fees go to that support. >> host: freelancer on twitter, how much debt did bush leave? i read 11.5 trillion spent in eight years and the gop act like they have nothing to do with the
is blackmailing europe over energy. >> customers continue to say they need the pipeline. >> fossil fuel industry will always outspend everybody else. >> look at what is happening in ukraine. >> it's mainly about energy. >> great suggestions, one the keystone pipeline. >> marketplace continues to push to build the pipeline. >> i'm right when i talk about that inherent link between energy and security. >> i know that pipeline is necessary. >> america needs pipelines. >> good to have you with us. thanks for watching. we're getting into the say anything, do anything phase of the keystone xl pipeline. all the smart people saying we got to have it. we must not be very secure right now. if we don't build this pipeline, we're not going to be very secure. you see, conservatives what they're doing right now is that they are exploiting a foreign policy situation overseas to get something that they really want and they really don't know a whole hell of a lot about. they are shamelessly using the crisis in the ukraine to push for the keystone xl pipeline. i say not so fast. the conservative noise machine is
the government off the backs and the necks of energy companies, as i have interviewed more people in the energy world. there is more energy combined in this country, shell oil, gas and coal than in the entire middle east combined. >> they're not going to complain there is a fracking problem in his neighborhood. >> he is seeing over it. >> and the polls show that most women wish they had the luxury to stay at home and raise their children. but what the vice president is talking about is not the luxury to stay home, it is doing it on other taxpayer's dimes, to get the subsidies in order to buy the health care plans. >> that is exactly what he is saying. >> not what he is talking about. >> the family of four. >> i agree. >> he is taking money from taxpayers to support -- to not work. >> real quick. >> if you stay home with children you know you are working more than any of us who are working full-time jobs. >> wait a minute. >> sean -- >> but who is paying for her to stay home. >> oh, my goodness. >> that is how liberals would like it. >> it is hard, hard work. >> i know it is hard work but why --
impact for ukraine. peter cook tells us how the ukraine is fueling the energy debate here in the states. ukraine. the latest on president obama says russian president vladimir putin has breached international law. the present spoke to reporters earlier today on the situation in crimea. thatere is a strong belief russia's actions is violating international law. president putin seems to think -- has a different set of lawyers making a different set of interpretations. that is fooling anybody. everybody recognizes that, although russia has legitimate interests in what happens in a neighboring state, that does not give them the right to use force as a means of inserting influence. said heresident also has not spoken to president putin since the weekend. let's get the latest on the --und rumble bloomberg ground from bloomberg. what is the latest in the standoff? much a tensel very standoff. there's is an air base down in crimea. it was taken over by russian forces over the weekend. this morning, ukrainian troops -- 300 of them -- marched back to that base and said they wanted it back. soldie
. his funds blew away the market last year. you done want to miss hpicks. >>> the energy departmentç approving loan guarantees for first new nuclear power plant in years. christine todd whitman tells us whether this is the beginning of a nuclear resurgence in this country. >> and chipotle trying to walk back comments that rising costs associated with climate change could eventually force the company to take guacamole or salsa off the menu. we have a stock brawl coming up. you're watching cnbc, first in business worldwide. for tapping into a wealth of experience. ♪ for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. ♪ for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. make it happen with fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. call or click to open your fidelity account today. >>> welcome back. the recent spike in energy p
the east of core ukraina lot of russian speakers there, fireworks in terms of energy prices in terms terms of energy prices in europe. >> europe depends on the infrastructure, tried to diversify a way away from russian energy, through the cast pecaspea sea. >> because the domestic supplies from these critical producers are dhoining, that really -- declining that really the pipeline supplies at a will be available for europe will be -- that will be available will be largely from russian gas. >> european leaders understand that, that's why they are calling for dialogue with, not sanctions against, russia. ali velshi, al jazeera. >> warren hogue, and from providence, rhode island, thomas nichols, professor of national security affairs. gentlemen, welcome. >> thank you. >> warren, let me start with you if i might. angela merkel suggested that the russian president is out of touch with reality tonight. is that just rhetoric or they have just lost control? >> i think what she said was he was from a different planet. i think exactly he is from a different planet. the russians view this differentl
will respond? the only country willing to bail out is russia the only country that determines the energy surplus so i think russia does have a decision making power. georgia would have been easy. i think he waits to play for the whole game because by made the ukrainians will be bankrupt or will be broke can you imagine saying vote for me? i want to raise your taxes and force the anti-corruption austerity budget. the russians know they fall in their lap. >> the signals that are sent to russia russian defense ministers saying russia is now planning the permanent military presence outside russia's borders including vietnam, cuba, venezuela, ni caragua singapore and other countries and back in november secretary kerry said the monroe doctrine is dead. did he just waved the flag for russian expansionism? >> that is one of many that the administration has been waving. as clap to america the monroe doctrine is not popular and tell it is needed then they want to know where the united states is of central and south america are very worried about russian participation adventurism and a return of r
of the leverage that president putin does have. partly, he has the energy, which flows underneath ukraine and supplies so much of europe. and more than that, he has now threatened, we are told, to no longer use the united states dollar as a currency on the world market. what if he did that? maria bartiromo from the fox business network will join us next to talk about the ramifications of such a thing. whether he could do it and what it would mean to our economy. would it, as the russians say, cripple our economy? that's next. t! [bell rings] this...is jane. her long day on set starts with shoulder pain... ...and a choice take 6 tylenol in a day which is 2 aleve for... ...all day relief. hmm. [bell ring] "roll sound!" "action!" [ chainsaw whirring ] humans -- sometimes liferips us up. sometimes we trip ourselveup. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... [ thump ] to speak with an insurance
that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said for that. as you know i'm more of a clean energy guy but taking that away from russia, their monopoly in energy, is good. but republicans are missing an opportunity to look more bipartisan. >> congressman engel, i think what bothers republicans is how much the president and the administration seems to have empowered putin over the past few years. just to give you a couple of examples. russia controls the northern distribution network which is one of the main access points in afghanistan that our troops rely on to get supplies and food and water. putin controls that. putin is controlling our syria chemical weapons collection deal, which is a farce. putin is undermining our negotiations in iran. have we given him too much power? why ha
. to the extent we could impose energy sanctions on russia, understandable and effect because they rely so much but i would go one more step and say by 2020 we are expected to be the world's leading producer of energy and there's talk about exporting natural gas, we need to make it clear we need to start planning for the long game and we will have natural gas with allies that reliance on russian gas to be accountable. stuart: it is all about energy, isn't it? a lot of europe is supplied with natural gas, a lot of that comes through ukraine and from russia. therefore, there is a limit to a and forbid its natural gas to get into europe. the europeans will never look at that. stuart: we have to take into account the effect this will have on their economy, doing things that will affect their allies may not be beneficial but if the president came out today, he won't but if he came out today and said we are an energy powerhouse we are committing that in ten years we have great contract with our allies that would scare the russians. vladimir putin does things with long hall and he knows is only play i
to happen. but at the end of the day, the only options we have are to increase our own energy independence, put energy in a position where putin doesn't have access to the energy reserves and to the reknew that's he's had in the past. so whether this president does it or the next president does it, somebody has to do it. and i keep going back, shannon, you know, we survived jimmy carter, we're going to survive barack obama, but it will be incumbent on the next president to stop president obama. otherwise, neither will stop president putin. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> thank you, shannon. >>> the top democrat in the senate says the obamacare horror stories are live. that has some experiencing them first hand pretty fired up. >> i'm completely outraged. it's absolutely ridiculous. >> we're going debate the issue fair and balanced, of course, next. >>> another snowstorm spreading across the country gearing up to hit the east coast tonight. whether you want them or not, you need to know. [ female announcer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made
's parliament, kerry promised a billion dollar loan guarantee designed to ease the sting of energy costs. officials traveling with kerry had voiced concern that russian president vladimir putin who last week sent tens of thousands of forces may be preparing for a larger invasion of eastern ukraine. putin himself looking relaxed at a state res dnls outside moscow held a rare news conference in which he suggested any such broader invasion would be a last resort but well within russia's right because they have received approval by yanukovych. >> even if i take a decision to use armed force, it would be legitimate, in the norms of international law, and in this case, it would also correspondent to our interest in protecting the people who are closely tied to us historically, culturally, economically. >> kerry has emphasized the u.s. wants to de-escalate the crisis, responding to putin's comments. >> he really denied there were troops in crimea? >> yes, he did. >> i have spoken directly to president putin today as i can. it is not appropriate to invade a country and at the end of a barrel of
solution is, if we could get the government off the backs and the necks of energy companies, as i have interviewed more people in the energy world, there is more energy combined in this country, shale, oil, gas and coal than the entire middle east combined. >> take us out. >> most women wish they had the luxury to stay at home and raise their children. but what the vice president is talking about is not the luxury to stay at home, it's doing it on other taxpayer's dimes. subsidies for families -- [ all talking at once ] >> if you stay home with children, you know you are working more than any of us who are working full time jobs. >> i know it's hard work, but look, she -- >> why describe it as not working and relaxing around? [ all talking at once ] >> what's more important? >> i love your daughter, she's a sweet heart. >> my husband and i built a lifestyle where we both had to work, so you do what you have to do. >> i've got to break. we'll take a break and come back. coming up next -- >> it's not that i want to punish you, i just want to make sure everybody who is behind you that the
television service. number three is fuel energy. fuel cell, which reports earnings on march 10, is one of the most overbought stocks. >> i am talking cars. the auto-parts retailer reporting in nine percent increase as well as sales growth of four percent. severe winter weather actually helps sales by accelerating demand area >> number one is radioshack. shares plunged more than 25% after the electronics chain announced plans to close up to 1100 stores in the u.s., or 20% of its footprint. radioshack also reported a significantly wider loss for the fourth quarter. are also keeping our eyes on shares of smith and west. the gunmaker reporting earnings after the close today. a bumpy ride for alix steel, and paul barrett joins us from washington. on god's.t with you we saw them take off in 2013 under the threat of more regulation. what is happening, why this decline now? >> there has not been any kind of tragedies. if you take a look at federal background check which analysts say can be a relatively good barometer for sales, they tend to increase we see some kind of national shooting. auror
this is a tiny economy and russia is a third world economy for its energy sector but the point is -- bob, let me go to you. the point is europe could get involved, natural gas shutdowns could get involved and these kinds of tensions have a way of rippling through. i like this reuters announcement, i'm going to assume it's true. i like the sound of it. the stock market may not like the sound of it because it's the united states being tough and kind of in your face to putin. let's face it, bob, putin's thugs have taken over the sovereign state of crimea, ended the legislature, ended the prime minister and therefore we've got to do something about that. >> correct. forget these statistics. the ukraine is one quarter of one percent of whatever. 1997, larry, i was down on the floor of the new york stock exchange when the tide bot collapsed and nobody was saying that tie land was an important part of the economy but the ripple effects around the world were felt in other economies. it's the butterfly wings in africa that causes storms in the united states. >> it was the anchovies off the coast of peru.
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
to be placed on russia economically. they are an energy export dependent economy. once that we can do is to open up our export of liquefied natural gas. it will have a huge impact on the price and that russia enjoys in their monopoly dominated europe. i have a bill that would have expanded the gas exports to nato. dropping a bill today that will expanded even further. entering this in the national market and economically impact russia. neil: at the very least we should re-examine our opposition to drafting and some states. that is just more energy for us and the one thing that i'm curious about is it's precisely that energy independence. we need a lot of energy coming via russia and the ukraine. so don't think that. >> it certainly is an issue. they are, as you describe, being economically impacted by some very old things. this president needs to step it up and in that weakness, russia will be adventurous spirit even if they are and they start feeling the pain of their own stupidity or bullying, maybe that is what gives them cause in the future and tyrants who might think about doing
in europe and it has really shrunk. potentially, they have big energy plans for europe. >> it is not proven yet. >> if it turns out that american companies are there -- >> let me ask about the united states. >> yeah. crimea, the have gas and -- but let me ask you about the united states role. you had friendly relations with george bush and you had good relations with the obama administration. i expect that you feel that the administration was not as helpful to georgia as they could have been and will not be as helpful in the ukraine because the united states has bigger fish to fry with russia. i do not think anybody can afford to neglect this. if they do, it is a major disaster. this guy is dangerous. this is going to continue. it is not limited to crimea. it allows us to have another crisis moving somewhere and everybody forgets what happened in georgia apostates. it is getting shorter and -- ter and >> to be fair, he said that he did not feel any need to escalate. >> they are using the word of escalation stop there with the occupation and europeans might escalating.is he is escalating. le
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
. why? because rush ha is blackmailing europe over energy. supplies a third of oil and natural gas to the eu. the more oil and natural gas the u.s.a. and canada can produce and distribute, the weaker russia becomes on the world stage i fervently hope president obama understands that finally, there is barack obama's legacy. hear's a satirical picture posted on fox nation showing the contrasting styles of putin and obama. obviously the russian leader sees himself as macho man. the president sees himself as a renaissance man who wants to accommodate. but there is no accommodating putin. and if the u.s.a. looks weak on this one, believe me, we'll pay a heavy price. as will the president's historical reputation. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction joining us from boston fox news military analyst colonel david hunt and -- am i making mistakes here, mr. whiten? >> no, i don't think so. i would add a few other things to the list. you know, we can be specific with building -- helping central europe get free of russian energy. it's russian energy that's been used agai
, the reality is that russia has a lot of nuclear weapons. their economy is modest except for energy, and they're not a great power, but they have the ability to pick them off one at a time. their neighbors abroad, they can do that, they went into georgia as you'll recall. ukraine is enormously important to the world. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of g
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
, including in energy. and we think it makes a lot of sense to have this pipeline proceed, but not only proceed with can needian oil but balkan oil from canada. the oil is coming down to the united states now, as the state department has properly documented, it's coming down on rail and you and i both know highway 2 in north dakota, 500 tanker trucks a day with oil and we think it makes more sense to be an to pipeline. >> so, tar sands oil, to be very clear is already being refined in the gulf? >> yes, it is. >> okay. and this would just bring more of it to market? >> well, not -- well, yes it would bring more, but it would bring it with a pipeline and the state department, you have people, as you say, on either side of this issue. >> sure h. >> but if we look at the independent dent meritorious review of the state department and the 2,000 pages, they say it's safer, it's less cost and it has less greenhouse gases to have it on a pipeline rather than rail and trucks. and as i say, you and i both know highway 2 in north dakota. >> sure. >> 7500 -- 500 trucks a day you have a democratic s
, pointing out that russia is germany's biggest supplier of energy. we know that merkel spoke with our president last night. she spoke with putin several times since the crisis started. could she be a key player in potentially resolving this situation? >> yes. absolutely. i mean, germany, after all, is the most important military and economic power in europe. the problem here, as you rightfully point out, is that most of germany's natural gas supplies run through that natural gas pipelines through ukraine, from russia, to germany. she's already signaled that she's not in favor of imposing economic sanctions on russia. well, if she's not in favor of supporting economic sanctions on -- on russia as well as denying russia a space in the g-8 and turning that into the g-7, it sort of defangs the capacity of the united states to act forcefully with putin if he decides that, well, what -- what matters to him if he moves his forces into eastern ukraine. who's going to stop him. >> yeah, and josh, i also want to touch on the energy and economics issues which are important here. >> yeah. >> a lo
exports travel through the pipelines that go through ukraine, so how is energy factoring in this equation? >> it's vital. we're being aggressive because we don't depend on russian energy, where as the germans, this is a big debate. maybe this is a positive thing that the russians depend on a trade with europe and why putin's backing off now, or does it make the europeans dependent on russia? >> it's fot really an option for russia to stop the exports. that would be self defeating economically. >> true, but we were talking earlier, on monday the russian stock market lost $70 billion, at the same time, vladimir putin spent $50 billion on the sochi olympics, so i think it's the economic costs making it pause now. >> at some point it's got to have enough of an impact on the russian economy that he's sitting up and taking notice. >> yes, that's why the u.s. is pushing harder for economic sanctions. i think the economic issues make him pause. he's unlikely to push further into ukraine with his troops, but if he feels he's going to lose his warm water port in crimea, which this is all about, he
. the department of energy opened the facility in 1999, to house the by-product of nuclear weapons. it has hazmat gloves, suits, and is supposed to entomb the materials for 10,000 years. that is until the year 11,999 ad. if, as reports reports suggest, the place has failed, that means it failed before it reached a quarter of 1% of its life span. i spoke with an academic, and he described a warren of panels. at the end of the horizontal shafts in the rooms the size of a football field, barrels of radioactive trash sits on pallets. over the cores of years, they are supposed to collapse. it's not clear how radiation might have gotten loose. the site was chosen for geological stability. it makes for a handy material. there's no groundwater to speak of in next coe. as described to me, there is a tremendous amount of monitoring equipment, the workers are in close proximity and would be exposed if there was a leak. this is a unique facility. nowhere else in the world is there a permanent resting place. a deep repository. this is a place where the planning and resources were gathered in one place and bro
increase in energy prices which there already seems to. it's not as though their customers in europe can stop buying energy because they're unhappy with what is happening in ukraine. i'm not sure that it hurts russia all that much. >> earlier it was looking like anti-government protesters had the upper hand. we had yanukovych on the run. we had tymoshenko released from prison. but does this show us now that progress was not necessarily a win? >> absolutely. and i think that's the real missing story here that has not been adequately covered. what is the legally elected president of ukraine, mr. yanukovych, who is now taking refuge in russia and still claims to be the legal president, some how you could have a street demonstrators including some very violent armed people drive the president out of the capitol and say, okay, we win now, you lose. you have to accept this. the russians are saying, um, no, we don't. we have cards to play here, too. we don't recognize this government or so-called government in kiev which frankly doesn't even control kiev. the people on the streets say if they a
and energy expansion cancelling preparations for a g8 summit in sochi, russia are temporary and could be reveersed. if the united states and its western allies hit russia with economic sanctions or deny moscow access to global financial networks and key international bank accounts the damage to the russian economy could be longlasting and it could put u.s.-russian relations in the deepest, most confrontational stance they've been in the entire obama presidency. some believe putin has overplayed his hand and will not fire shots in crimea and will not move his forces into less friendly parts of ukraine. with canada great britain, france, and germany all against russia moscow's own status in the g8 is also in jeopardy. these nations are also preparing, along with the united states, an economic package to rescue the transitional and fragile government in ukraine itself. the united states doesn't need or want to punish russia necessarily for this violation of the international law. it wants moscow to back off and ease the tensions. right now, as elizabeth palmer ju
-up. 5.5 million euros per day. russia is a major exporter of energy to europe and a lot of those pipelines go through ukraine. this is a fear premium put into the price of energy and it is affecting our everyday prices. charles: it has applications to the idea this will be east-west, for tat economic sanctions. to a large degree europe needs that oil. sandra: this is also being seen as an opportunity for the united states. the reopen of the discussion of the keystone pipeline, more exports of liquefied natural gas. this could be an opportunity for the united states. charles: oil was already breaking out before this crisis. anything else going on beneath the surface other than the headlines? sandra: it is a safe haven buying. people want to own something other than equities because they see those as the riskiest assets to own right now. charles: a huge move up $31, what is it? gold has one of the roughest years ever last year, now all of a sudden it is seen as a safe haven, why is it a safe haven? sandra: everybody institutionally are piling on. the most bullish they have been on
, there could be fireworks in terms of energy prices. >> europe depends on natural gas and pipes that brings in through russia and the ukraine. europe tried to diverse vi away by investing in pipelines to the caspian see and north africa. growth in europe's demand for the natural gas eats up much of the new participation supply. >> europe is primarily pipeline gas market. because the domestic supplies from the critical producers are declining, that really the pipeline supplies that will be available for europe will be largely from russian gas. >> european leaders understand this, and are calling for dialogue with, not sanctions against russia. >> the threat of economic sanctions is taking a toll on russian's currency, hitting a record low on monday. >> the murder trial of former olympic blade runner oscar pistorius is under way. oscar pistorius is accused of the valentine's day 2013 shooting of his girlfriend model reeva steenkamp. the first witness told the court she heard a woman's blood cu curdling screams, and then gunfire. oscar pistorius said he mistook his girlfriend for a burglar. >>
the effects of reduced energy subsidies from russia. that's why ukrainians have been getting oil and gas and been able to do it cheaply. now that they want to rebuild the economy, they need to work with the imf on this. one of the things the imf is looking for them to do is raise energy prices. a lot is geared toward the energy factor. u.s. is sending technical advisors to work with the government on energy reforms and other types of financial reforms that they need to do to rebuild the economy. they also want to help the ukrainian businesses. they're talking about further assistance. they'll be sending advisors to work on anticorruption and recovering. is it enough? don't know. the ukrainians said they need $30 billion to rebuild the economy. this is a drop in the bucket. >> obviously the administration has been trying to motivate and rally members of the european union to join them in threatening at the at least sanctions and of punishments against the russian government and individuals in the russian government perhaps. i'm wondering what you've heard about the difficulties the u.s. h
on for weeks and 18 people have died. venezuela is rich in energy but poor in necessities like milk. david will help explain the sometimes complex relationship between our two countries. >> david? >> this is venezuela's largest port city. we have refineries behind us and it's areas like these that are critical to venezuela's future. the influence in the region is wielded through petroleum. we talk about protests. we talk about high stakes in region where there is much natural gas and much crude oil. this is in many ways is why what happens in venezuela is so important. oil. venezuela is the fourth largest supplier of crude oil to the united states behind canada, saudi arabia and mexico, and has the largest reverse in th resere world. but because it does not have an refineries an unlikely partnership has emerged from the united states and this south american nation. >> years ago even under hue go chavez, when he's talking about our being the devil or some of these rhetorical positions, the bottom line is that the united states is the closest largest market for venezuelan oil. >> and the u.
energy found in peanuts? caramel works. payday. crunchy, roasted peanuts and soft, delicious caramel come together to give you sweet energy. payday. fill up and go. excuse me miss but i'm going to have to take a closer look... ...at those fancy jeans. (makes bleeping noises) woman: uhh... connie: your jeans they fit so good! woman: i got them at old navy, nineteen bucks! connie: larry! these jeans are only nineteen bucks at old navy! (crowd gasps) larry: those jeans are only 19 dollars?! woman: and kids jeans are twelve dollars! connie: woaaaw! (music starts) larry: connie wait!! >> that's it for the report, everybody. good night! ♪ i'm going down to south park, gonna have myself a time ♪ ♪ friendly faces everywhere ♪ humble folks without temptation ♪ ♪ going down to south park, gonna leave my woes behind ♪ ♪ ample parking day or night ♪ people spouting, "howdy, neighbor" ♪ ♪ heading on up to south park, gonna see if i can't unwind ♪ ♪ mrph rmhmhm rm! mrph rmhmhm rm! ♪ ♪ come on down to south park and meet some friends of mine ♪ [ humming ] here you go, kyl
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